The 3rd Annual Do Something About Antibiotics Challenge™

Antibiotics treat certain infections caused by bacteria. They do not treat viruses like the cold or flu. When they are not needed, antibiotics won't help you, and the side effects could still hurt you. Be Antibiotics Aware. For more information, please visit cdc.gov/antibiotic-use.

This November, we are teaming up with the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to challenge students to do something about superbugs and the global antibiotic crisis. This is in recognition of the CDC’s Annual Antibiotic Awareness Week (November 12th-18th) and global activities from the World Health Organization and other stakeholders.

Superbugs are causing a global crisis, killing more than 700,000 people each year, and are projected to become the most important medical challenge of the 21st century (WHO). Without action, we risk turning back the clock to a world where simple infections could kill otherwise healthy individuals just as they did prior to the discovery of antibiotics. If we do not find new antibiotics and take significant action, superbugs will become a leading cause of death worldwide by 2050, killing more people than cancer and diabetes combined.

We are running out of time on confronting one of the most pressing global challenges of our time. It is not too late. You can do something about it. If you would like to participate, please click here to read the challenge announcement and rules. If you would like to see the creative and impactful ways students around the world are taking action on one of the most pressing global challenges of our time, check out some of last year’s video entries below or listen to one of our incredibly catchy antibiotic resistance songs from students Molly Jorgenson and Hannah Schweitzer.


Watch how students around the world are taking action on the global antibiotic crisis.

TEAM: YURIY MAKSYMYUK, SARA ABBOUD, JILL OATES, TARA ALLEYASIN, CATHERINE LAI, BEOUNG LEE, JASMINE HUYNH, WAYNE HUYNH, MARC MORADA, & ALFONSO ESQUIVEL; UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE; SWIPI: DR. JULIA MASSIMELLI.

TEAM: MELISSA DURAN, KARINA RAMIREZ, CARLA TORRES, & NINA ARUTYUNYAN; NATIONAL UNIVERSITY; SWIPI: DR. ANA MARIA BARRAL.

TEAM: BEATRIZ MARTIN HERREROS & ROBERTO MONLLOR GUERRA; UNIVERSITY OF VALENCIA; SWIPI: DRS. SERGI MAICAS & ELENA G. BIOSCA.

TEAM: JOSHUA BERGERON, MARK BURCH, LONG NGUYEN, & STEVE FAGAN; JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE; SWIPI: DR. HEATHER SEITZ.


November Do Something About Antibiotics Fundraiser

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The Small World Initiative® strives to inspire the next generation of scientists, transform STEM education, and increase scientific literacy while taking action on the most pressing global health challenges of our time – superbugs and the antibiotic crisis. Through efforts across six continents, students and instructors are hunting for new antibiotics in soil to combat this global crisis! We need your support to continue and scale our efforts. This November, donate to the Small World Initiative to do something about the antibiotic crisis. Every dollar counts!

Ways to donate:

*The Small World Initiative is a registered 501(c)(3) public charity and has been organized exclusively for charitable, scientific, and educational purposes. Donations to the Small World Initiative are tax-deductible to the full extent of the law. Employer Identification Number: 81-1772308. Registered Name: Small World Initiative, Inc.

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About Superbugs and the Growing Global Antibiotic Crisis

Antimicrobial resistance is not a future threat looming on the horizon. It is here, right now, and the consequences are devastating.
— Dr. Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization

We are on the precipice of entering a post-antibiotic era, when a scraped knee or common infection may prove deadly for an otherwise healthy individual. Existing antibiotics are losing efficacy due to widespread antibiotic-resistant "superbugs". If no significant action is taken by 2050, superbugs will kill more people than cancer and diabetes combined and result in 300 million premature deaths (Review on AMR). Although the United Nations calls this "the greatest and most urgent global risk," pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from developing new antibiotics in favor of more lucrative ventures. Formulated at Yale University, the Small World Initiative® (SWI) is addressing this worldwide health threat through innovative and inspiring science curriculum. SWI centers around an introductory biology course in which students perform hands-on field and laboratory research on soil samples in the hunt for new antibiotics. This is particularly relevant as over two thirds of antibiotics come from soil bacteria or fungi. 

Since its inception, SWI has grown rapidly to include more than 275 participating schools across 41 US states and 14 countries. Read our press release from SWI President and CEO Erika Kurt on how students from around the world are joining forces to tackle the antibiotic crisis through SWI's novel "crowdsourcing" approach. If you are interested in sponsoring our important work, please Contact Us. To learn more about our work and the antibiotic crisis, please click here.


Mission

The Small World Initiative® (SWI) strives to combine technology, science, and innovation to make meaningful and measurable improvements in the global education and healthcare landscape.

The mission of the program is twofold.

First, it seeks to encourage students to pursue careers in science and increase scientific literacy through real-world applicable laboratory and field research in introductory courses.

Second, it aims to address a worldwide health threat – the diminishing supply of effective antibiotics – by tapping into the collective power of many student researchers concurrently tackling the same challenge, living up to its motto “crowdsourcing antibiotic discovery.”™


Join Us

If you are interested in bringing the Small World Initiative® to your institution, please check out our resources for prospective instructors and consider submitting an application to apply to teach here. The latest edition of the Small World Initiative's course materials (Small World Initiative: A Research Guide to Microbial and Chemical Diversity and Small World Initiative: Research Protocols) may be ordered from XanEdu here or directly from Amazon Prime here. Should you have any other questions, please Contact Us.



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